Who Gives a Toss!

The reason for people wanting to go fishing has been debated at length a great many times, and there has been much pontification about it. In this connection it has been suggested that by taking folk away from the stress of modernity and the grime of the concrete jungle into the fresh air the cost of the National Health Service has been reduced. All this may be true or otherwise but one can persume that people go because they enjoy it.

One may be inclined to feel that formerly anglers had a clear idea about the pleasure of angling and that associations were organised mainly from this point of view.

Often there is an appearance that a keepnet stuffed with fish is always synonymous with satisfactory fishing, and a blank means failure. It is not true. Many of the happiest days have been spent with a very modest catch. To be perfect, the day needs something more than just the catching of fish. Just what is required is governed by the outlook and temperament of the individual.

To me fishing is a good excuse to be in the countryside and to enjoy what it has to offer in terms of its flora and fauna. Others may look for more. The companionship of friends or chance acquaintance add so much to the day.

Now it seems that an intensity and seriousness is creeping from a certain standpoint. It is probable

the influence of contest fishing has some thing to do with this. The pleasure and excitement which fishing matches bring is obvious and no one would deny them it. The participation of fishing a match is an opportunity to pit ones skills against other anglers and to bring forth the competitive spirit and of course the friendship and banter. There is, however, a feeling that the availability of large prizes and pools which has permeated the match scene has taken away a chunk of relaxed ambience from certain types of matches. The need to win as opposed to, like to win, has created in some respect an air of tension. This is far removed from the older concept of the ‘contemplative man’s sport’. I know it take allsorts to make a world but I take my cue from that old adage of ‘it’s not the winning that counts but the taking part’ this is just as well as my sedate attitude to my match fishing results has been put to the test many times. The last match (read on) is no exception. Thus my tranquil and placid frame of mind just leads me to say “who gives a toss there is always next time”.

Match fished at Shiplate Main Lake on July 2nd.

Good old Stuart Frampton had a shocker of a match last time out on the canal lake at the Sedges but made up for that this time by getting top spot from peg 15. Fishing to the reeds to his left with feeder and once again and in his own words the bait used was “all sorts”

Second place went to veteran silvers man Dave Nash. Dave only had a carp weight of 16 lb 13oz hence the bulk of his net was made up with a not to be sniffed at silvers haul of 37 lb 07oz. Thus he had a good pay out for coming 2nd in the match and having top sliver weight. Now Mr Nash has no excuse for not getting a hair cut else he’s going to end up looking like Cousin It from the Adams Family.

Carp basher extraordinaire, one Eric Searle got third spot with 49 lb 9 oz from peg 14 b. Eric kept things nice and simple with feeder and pellet.

Alan Bland had the highest weight on the near bank with 33 lb 15 oz. Guess what the bait was, yep that’s right his beloved paste.

Ian Grabham from peg 14 also followed in Mr Blands foot steps and used paste to gain 5th spot with 33lb 01 oz.

Rob Dodd found himself in strange territory by not catching a carp. But as usual put in a good showing by having 2nd top weight in the silvers which got him in at number 6. He fished the margins to his right with corn.

In at number 7 we find Ian Ricketts. Ian just had one carp, but what a cracker coming in at 16 lb 03 oz. Ian used mostly worm and pellet as bait.

Dave Colley who took my pound fished peg 12 with mostly pellet and feeder and obtained a weight of 23 lb 05 oz for 8th.

On peg 1 we had Tony Richards who had an all silvers haul of 21 lb 11 oz and with that finished in 9th.

Paul Smith paid me a visit 2 hours in to the match and reported that he was struggling but managed to redeem himself some what with an all silvers weight of just a tad over 20 lb for 10th placing.

In 11th place we have the one and only Bob Pascoe who mostly fished maggot from peg 4 and put 16 lb 04 oz on the scales.

When I visited dear old Alan Jenkins more or less straight away after the match on my way to the car park, the first thing he said “I’ve got no carp” Well Alan you are not alone in fact that makes 6 of us all together. Alan using chopped worm and caster from peg 3 for a haul of 10 lb 04 oz.

Well as logic dictates some one has to have the lowest weight and alas it was yours truly. With what can only be describe as a meagre and somewhat feeble catch of 5 lb 10 oz from peg 8. I fished the margins to my left to a fence which partly went into the water. I did hook 2 carp but typical the fore mentioned fence proved my undoing and became a place of escape for these hooked beasties. But most of the time as you can guess my swim was it seems devoid of fish. That is until the weighing in gang enters my swim armed with clip board, scales, tripod, weigh sling and weigh mat. The usual words were uttered with a mixture of amusement and sarcasm” here’s the winner” “top peg this” etc, etc. The question was asked “whereabouts did you fish Pete?” I pointed to the left hand margin and to my surprise and annoyance, there they where swirling, bubbling, showing tails and doing everything possible to make their presence known. It appeared it was the fish equivalent to showing the finger. Little bastards.

Poor Nigel Coram had a torrid time by all accounts and just ended up with the dreaded DNWI next to his name.

Results
Top silvers

The next match will be on July 16th at the Sedges on Tile lake. May I recommend the breakfast.

Until then tight lines.

Pete C

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